Gregory Gondwe, Malawi Best Blogger 2014

Sunday, September 14, 2014

Piracy resurrects Ned Mapira

This week on Monday my brother, Ephraim, called me from the grounds of Hyper Store in City Centre Lilongwe. Apparently, he was in his car at the parking lot waiting for my in-law, Clara, who had gone inside for some purchases, when vendors selling different wares approached him.
What attracted him were music CDs which had my face on them and he was taken aback thinking that I have ventured into music – meaning not writing and critiquing the performances of our artists as I do over here week in week out, but the actual singing that has culminated into an album.
On close inspection, he discovered that in fact the CD indicated that it was the work of the fallen musical great Ned Mapira whose album 'Chosatha', a traditional music album, sold over 63,000 copies posthumously.
The vendor demanded K1, 500 for the CD but using his negotiation skills my brother got it down to K500.
My brother called me instantly to meet him having bought the CD. I drove to City Centre where he gave me the CD and, indeed there I was, on the cover of Ned Mapira’s pirated work.
When I reached the parking space of the Hyper Store the vendors, including those selling the pirated music, swarmed around me. My heart bled when I discovered that the extent of producing and selling pirated work has gotten worse.
Well, the first feeling was that of anger, and questions started welling up within my psyche for I thought this was the prize those in the business of piracy have decided to give me, finally, for crying out loud!
When I had taken a Ned Mapira CD, then it dawned on the vendors who I was. I was Mapira’s ghost and they all vanished, and not before snatching the CD from my hand.
It’s a pity that for a mere K500 or K1000 one can buy a single CD with Lucius Banda’s all 17-lifetime-albums. The vendors are putting all the Kuimba albums, all the lifetime toils of The Black Missionaries, in just one CD for a K500.
People have argued before against the tendency. The artists have complained loudly that piracy is killing them but those that have the powers to control it have either failed or they just don’t care.
For argument’s sake, one might say people still love Ned Mapira and, since our music marketing and distributing system is mediocre - if not  nonexistent - then those that need the music can do with the provisions created by those pirating. But what would you say about Lucius Banda or Mablacks’ music which has also been denigrated in the manner I have described above when it has well supplied distribution system?
There was a time when I asked the question on these same pages on how the dead musicians get their royalties where I looked at the big difference between doing something in Malawi and doing similar thing in the West.
There was a time that I wondered on this very page why Michael Jackson’s riches are increasingly making him posthumously richer when there is no penny to show for Malawi’s fallen reggae hero Evison Matafale.
Without bothering to look at a well-coordinated system where musicians outside can release just a mere single and hit gold and continue making more money even after they die, I want us to look at what happens to music of our dead musicians.

We still hear songs on our radios that were done by the late Robert and Arnold Fumulani, Alan Namoko, Daniel and MacDonald Kachamba, States Samangaya and the list goes on and on. Where are the royalties and how different is it when vendors are cashing on the work of the dead?

This might look as if it is the problem for the dead, but, as I faced it this week in Lilongwe, believe you me piracy is the cancer that will kill the living artist.

Wednesday, September 10, 2014

Where are the Sunbird stars?

So, the Sunbird ‘Search for a Star’ is now in eviction phase which is a sure way of trying to ape the South African and US Pop Idols, although without being a complete replica when it comes to what accrues for the competitors.
Look, the American Idols, for example, since it began airing on Fox on June 11, 2002, has not only become one of the most successful shows in the history of American television, but also has spawned 345 Billboard chart-toppers besides producing what have become top international stars like Kelly Clarkson, Carrie Underwood, Daughtry, Fantasia, Ruben Studdard, Jennifer Hudson, Clay Aiken, Adam Lambert and Jordin Sparks.
Of course, the South African idols has its fair share of controversies as the television show on the South African television network, M-Net, as - until its eighth season - the contest only determined the white competitors as best young singers in South Africa until Khaya Mthethwa became its first black winner, ending the dominance of racial minorities.
The good news is that Mthethwa took home a prize package worth almost R1m, including a recording contract with Universal Music, South Africa.
It is apparent that someone watched both the US and South African pop idols, both of which base their format on the British series, and thought of replicating the same back home.
The Sunbird ‘Search for a Star’, other than the marketing ploy that it is, is but a mockery of the ‘stars’.
Adrian Kwelepeta fast comes to mind. He won the last season and it’s just now that he has been able to release an album. He says this is the case because he was searching for resources.
Apart from promoting the Sunbird brand, the country’s search for a star really also needs to ensure that the stars are not just fading.
The initiative is commendable because it is the best when it comes to isolating the stars from the crowd. My opinion is that it, however, needs to take a mile further by finding the stars institutions that should train them to become professional musicians.
At the current trend, it is all clear that these youths, who are hungry for fame and swayed by the belief that what their vocal cords can project is sweet sound that can stand the musical test, will remain being used as pawns in this marketing promotion game.
The flowing of benefits in the end create a disharmony of sorts as it is one-sided, flowing at the promotion of the corporate firms without trickling down to those players that make the whole event matter.    
Adrian pocketed a K500, 000 prize money but where did it take him to if for a year he had to hunt for resources to record an album?
By the way, where is the second spot winner, Chisomo 'Chichi', and, of course, the third winner, Ruth Magona?
Of course, the organisers say the Sunbird ‘Search for a Star’ was a success in 2013 and the competition has proven effective as a corporate social responsibility intervention to showcase innovative singing talent among the youth of Malawi.
I know Sunbird has been partnering E-Wallet to implement and manage the show. E-Wallet’s Felix Njawala says, through the show, they intend to enhance and enrich musical talent in the country putting much focus on the youth.

But where is the talent that E-wallet unveiled? Where are the Sunbird ‘stars’ that were ‘searched’ and ‘found’ through last season’s event?

Wednesday, September 3, 2014

Why Oliver Mtukudzi still matters

Was it a privilege? Yes, I guess it was.
On the night of Wednesday, August 20, I had an opportunity to share the same dinner table with Oliver Mtukudzi, hosted by Latitude 13, barely 48 hours before he staged a sterling performance at the Bingu International Conference Centre auditorium on invitation by Qoncept Creative which is setting some ambitious bars in the entertainment business.
Talking to him on the day, his voice was perpetually husky; you needed to pay close attention to listen to what exactly he was talking about.
Also present on the table were his female vocalists, Alice Muringayi and Fiona Gwena, as well as his drummer Sam Mataure and a youthful bass guitarist, Enoch Piroro.
The one who was taking command of the conversation was Sam who talked a lot about their globe-trotting career which has taken them to almost all corners of planet earth.    
Both Tuku and Sam recalled names of people they have dealt with in Malawi before, including Enoch Mbandambanda and a music promoter from Blantyre called Pedro, whom Tuku described as the calmest Malawian he has ever met.
Both Sam and Tuku recalled how disorganised this promoter was. He was so disorganised that everything that was supposed to facilitate their performance was not adding up and yet Pedro never pressed the panic button as he kept assuring them with aplomb that all was well.
The instruments were poor, they remembered, and that when they reached the stage it was very dark they had to use headlamps from two vehicles that were positioned on the either side of the stage for the show to take place.
Well, this is a story for another day.
At the dinner the impression Tuku gave me was that age was catching up with him although he is only 62. His speech was almost a drawl, twiddling around issues like he was not ready to talk at all.
Even when my colleague Yvonne Sundu and I asked to talk to him away from the dinner table, for him just to rise from where he sat and walk to the place we needed him to be took a lot of effort.
But come Friday night at the Bingu International Conference Centre auditorium, I saw another Oliver Mtukudzi.
Throughout the show I kept asking myself how can one person live two lives that are a total contrast of each other?
From a seemingly tired old man to an energetic musical super star who danced throughout the 16 songs that he played for two hours running, I was left dazed with amazement at his energy-consuming dancing antics.
My fear throughout the performance was that fatigue will catch up with him. I was wrong. His dinner table fading voice was gone, replaced by a booming voice that has become the Tuku signature worldwide.
My goodness, Tuku and The Black Spirits only use five instruments for all the international appeal; the voice, the lead guitar, the bass, the drum and an occasional tambourine.

However, because Tuku is so good at his game, he leaves you with the impression that he has a whole range of instruments, including an orchestra, for his trademark Tuku music.

Learning from the best

 Last week I had the honour to be flown to Jo’burg by Malawian Airlines to interview headliners at this year’s Lake of Stars Music Festival.

These were the Mafikizolo duo, Theo Kgosinkwe and Nhlanhla Nciza, as well as South African Hip-Hop artist Sizwe Moeketsi aka Reason. 
One thing that came out clearly is the fact that being an artist is supposed to be an organised job.
The main issue that was not spoken during the two interviews, but was clearly registered on my mind, is that our musicians have not dared the music industry enough.
There is one advantage that comes with breaking into the international music market, which is to give it out to the audience in line with what you believe in.
Originality is the mother of best innovations and what has failed our musicians a lot is the proclivity to move with the crowd where if people like Joseph Nkasa’s beat, then if Moses Makawa will come on the musical scene then this is the beat to go with.
Talk of artists like Mafikizolo, for example; they came on the scene with hits like Kwela-kwela and had a break of seven years before re-emerging on the musical scene with a track like Khona which is a dare-devil departure from what they have been known for.
Nhlanhla, the female member of Mafikizolo, says change is growth and if you have to succeed in this business you have to be brave enough to try on other genres.
And it does not matter whether such genres were established already or are a product that becomes the artist's brain-child.
Even when you are playing genres like Hip-Hop that are already established, you have to do them better than the existing music because you risk imitating something that exposes not only your mediocre talent but your lack of ambition as well.
Take Reason, for example. He boasts of such a long history with Hip-Hop. He says to a certain degree he got so brave and started experimental approach to his creativity after feeling he had done just about everything with Hip-Hop.
He says Malawian artists must strive to be creative in whatever realm they pinch their beacons in in order to have to have a trans-generational appeal with their music.
He says, for example, he has caught his father listening to his album and he finds it instructive since that is the only way he can have a conversation with his father about his life experiences.
Apart from artists like Lawi, who would give you what is their concept of music, most of our artists lack courage to try out something new that should solely be a product of their imaginations.
My feeling is that unless we dare, we won’t break into the international music market.

Where is Lloyd Phiri’s song?

When you are a gospel artist you risk being dismissively given the rubbish tag that is cynical of every musical talent and endowment on display.
In the past, I have argued on the basis that every religious belief is a closed system and as a result it has its bedrock on a specific dogmatic belief. This is the reason one can neither question nor disagree with church authorities.
While the explanation is that God is Omnipotent, He was there and shall always be there looks like enough, it still has holes which fail to hold together even a child’s credulity.
This is where a belief will use its ‘closed system’ which simply shuts up you by saying it is the evil powers of Satan that drives you to ask such questions. This snaps any desire to ask more questions. This approach is what is usually looked at as a dogmatic slumber where you wake up at your own peril.
This frame is unfortunately one which most gospel musicians want to use. They sing very bad songs, which they are not even ashamed to put on CDs or tapes and call them albums, comfortable in the belief that no one will point a finger at their mediocrity because it is the Word of God.
Artists that are into gospel take it for granted that since it is gospel music then they could get away with murder.
No, as I have disputed before, I am not going to fall for that; this is a big blue lie. God loves beauty, this is the reason even his creations are beautiful, including Lucifer himself although in believers’ depiction he is shown as a badly-horned looking creature!
Lloyd Phiri, one of the country’s best gospel artists, has proven over the years that he is into the game of music not to hide behind gospel, but because he is a multi-talented artist.
Lloyd started his musical career in 1998 and since then he has released eight albums and six video albums.
To show how good he is, Lloyd has been a producer, an engineer and a session artist of different instruments in his studio. Some of the country’s top-notch gospel artists that have gone through his hands in his studio include Allan Ngumuya, Favoured Sisters, Allan Chirwa, Wyclief Chimwendo, Ethel Kamwendo Banda, The Joshua Generation, Thoko Katimba, Kafita Nursery Choir, Maggie Mangani, the late Geoffrey Zigoma, Bertha Nkhoma, Living Waters Praise Team and Princes Chitsulo.
In fact the famous track from Chitsulo, ‘Ndizayimba’, was done by Lloyd. 
And, if one traces Lloyd from 2001 when he released his first album Musagwedezeke - with hit song ‘Afuna Mulape’, you will appreciate how gifted he is. In fact, MBC listeners awarded this track as the Number One song in the ‘Entertainers of the year’ awards for 2002.
The following year he released Ndagwiritsa and another hit track on this album ‘Sindimatsilira Zachikunja’ won the MBC Entertainers of the Year’ award in the Best Song category for 2003.
He took a break when he went to the UK in 2003 where he started with several performances before enrolling with Manchester Christian College for Bible Studies. He returned in 2006 and opened Llohay Sound Control which is contraption of his name Lloyd and Harriet, his wife’s name. In fact Harriet is one of his backing vocalists in the Happiness Voices Band.
The studio has now changed name to One Heart Studios.
The same year he released a third album Nkadangokhuza which he recorded and mastered in his new studio. In 2007 he became the first musical artist to produce a live recorded album at the then French Cultural Centre.
In 2009 he released another album called Sikuthekera Kwanga. He also produced a live DVD Volume II but was duped by distributors and was left penniless.
For three-and-a-half years Lloyd struggled to revive his career by recording artists in his studio until indeed he managed to get enough resources to release a 15-track album Sachedwa Safulumira last year.
This is where there are tracks that have taken the consumers by storm such as ‘Wonkana Yesu’ and ‘Yesu Akubwera’. He has also included Praise and Worship tracks like ‘Yehova M’busa Wanga’ and ‘Inetu Ine’.
He has now released another album just this year called Assaulted, an English-dominated album with tracks like ‘It’s by Design’ which is against homosexuality.
He also did ‘One Love’ which a Lucky Dube total imitation.

Need I say more about Lloyd Phiri’s talent?

Chibuku’s failed musical road

I was privileged to have been one of the judges at last Saturday’s
Chibuku Road to Fame where twelve bands from the Northern,
Central, Eastern and Southern regions competed for the grand prize of K1 million, plus a K400,000 recording deal, as well as a trip to the regional Chibuku Road to Fame in Botswana.

To start with, it was a disappointing encounter because, from the word
go, it looked as if those organising the event - the Musicians Union of
Malawi (MUM) and Chibuku Products Limited - were taken unawares to
put the event together.

By noon, when everything was supposed to have started, the
organisers were still mounting the stage. To make matters worse, this
continued even when bands started testing instruments which was a distraction to both the performers and the audience.

At the end of the show, I, together with the other panellists - veteran broadcaster and musician Maria Chidzanja Nkhoma and music lecturer at Chancellor College Andrew Falia, who was the Chief Judge - agreed that the competing groups should have refused to go ahead with the mediocre musical equipment.

I am not sure why the High Table was reserved for Sports and Youth Minister Grace Chiumia and her officials when the reason we had assembled at the venue was to let the performers play music and be judged.

Because of such a bad decision on how and where to set the stage, a number of things were clearly improvised. So the make-shift stage was clearly that - ‘makeshift’! No wonder it kept mocking the K15 million that was billed for the event.

Just to demonstrate how haphazard the preparations were, while the
competition was still on - and having realised that it would be past dusk before the charade would end - the organisers came on stage and started setting up lighting, something that would have been done at the time the stage was being constructed.

In the end, I was not surprised that one band disputed our judgment that its performance was ‘below par’ because it played in the dark.

Then there was the question of the poor output of the equipment which made voices hoarser than the normal voice of the artist. Or, in a number of instances, the bass guitar would eclipse all other instruments leading to a cacophony of disorganised noise.

I wonder why a competition worth K15 million could fail to hire top-class equipment like that of the calibre of the Mibawa Open Air Music Equipment or indeed the one belonging to Mr. Entertainers Promotion.

It is clear that due to lack of good quality bands that brought other
elements like Nyau, Beni and other traditional dancers managed to distract better musical judgement from the audience. In the end, a commendable initiative from Chibuku Products was reduced to be reduced as ‘one of those things’ that have failed to promote the growth of music in Malawi.

The idea of throwing light on talent that is hidden in dark corners of
the country for us all to see and appreciate is really what the local
music industry badly needs. However, when badly done, we should not allow ourselves to be shut up for fear of scaring away the potential sponsors.


If Chibuku Products Limited and MUM think of putting K15 million to good use, they need to be well organised. They should not be afraid to approach those that have music equipment that matter for the sake of the competition. After all, it is going to be a musical competition.

When Nigeria invades Malawi

I am not even in doubt; we are musically under heavy attack from
Nigerians. All, if not most, vehicles in public transport system have
the dominance of Nigerian music.

There have been funny names and titles from this West African country
where musical artists have come on the scene and left the local music
lovers none-the-wiser.

It all started with artists like D'banj real name ‘Dapo Daniel
Oyebanjo’ Nigeria’s pop duo, P-Square of Peter and Paul Okoye as well
as Flavour (Chinedu Okoli) it was more like one on those once off
thing.

But lately with the mergence on the scene of more Naija artists, as
they call it there, like Mcgalaxy with tracks like 'Skeme', Udoka
Chigozie Oku a.k.a Selebobo who has featured J. Matin in a remix track
called ‘Yoyo’.

There is also Enetimi Alfred Odom better known by his stage name
Timaya who has done a track famously known as ‘Shake your Bum Bum’,
Nwanchukwu Ozioko, (a.k.a Vast) is one half of the popular singing
duo, Bracket whose other member is Obumneme Ali a.k.a. Smash. Ayodeji
Ibrahim Balogun known by his stage name Wizkid

Of all the names above one that seem to have taken control is the son
of a Billionaire business magnet David Adedeji Adeleke popularly
called Davido with tracks like Skelewu, Aye, and Gobe which are all
over places that use music in Malawi, of course except Churches but
not Christian weddings.

The Nigerian beat has become the heart beat of most entertainment
activities in Malawi and their music were popularised by sound tracks
in the films.

Of course Shemu Joya has tried to use local music by Agorroso in his
films Seasons of Life and The Last Fishing Boat but what I am talking
about is having a group of musical compatriots who would do music that
will have a recognisable element to be referred to as Nigerian genre
for example.

In a country like Malawi, you will have San B coming up with his own
thing and calls it ‘Honjo’ and Atumwi will call theirs ‘Sendeza’. The
African Representatives to the 2008 World Music Crossroads festival,
the Boys from Mzuzu ‘The Body, Mind and Soul’ will call theirs ‘Voodoo
jazz’. Tay Grin, Nyau Music.

When Malawians musicians claim that they have come up with their own
genre, are they fair to themselves?

Ben Mankhamba has tried to do a fusion of traditional dances with
western instruments and called it Beni, Mwinoghe, Vimbudza. You see,
our quest for a fixed and well established Malawian genre, has been
tedious at times; the other day Lucius Banda told us that we were
there with his ‘Zulu Woman’ beat.

Edgar and Davis thought a beat like ‘Kale-Kale’ was it; so were the
sounds that emerged from the Lhomwe belt of the likes of Alan Namoko
and Chimvu River Jazz Band and Michael Mukhito Phiri.Wambali
Mkandawire has never called what he plays anything else other than
African Jazz whatever this means.

Peter Mawanga and a certain sector of the industry believe he has
cracked the elusive code to establish the much sort after Malawian
genre with his type of music; but the response has only fascinated the
ear of those that can read music.

Daniel Kachamba and his brother Macdonald are said to have been
playing ‘Kwera’ music which musical historians claim was born right
here in Malawi during the Ndiche Mwalare/Alick Nkhata days. They claim
when Malawians were descending down South Africa in the 1940/50s they
took with them the ‘Kwera’ music which the South Africans took as
their own and perfected it and became a springboard that has helped
them established different genres that are still recognizable as South
African.

Now when you hear Ademwiche by Fikisa you do not even want to be told
that what you are listening to is a Malawian beat even with the
presence of modern instrumentation.

This is clear that this is a traditional beat. But like a chewed
bubblegum, where is it?

This is an argument I have ever made in the past, but point here today
is why Nigerian music has taken control of all our entertainment
joints.

Why is it that when it ripples within your earshot it is easily
recognisable as Malawian music?

Thursday, July 17, 2014

Chibuku’s failed musical road

I was privileged to have been one of the judges at last Saturday’s
Chibuku Road to Fame where twelve bands from the Northern,
Central, Eastern and Southern regions competed for the grand prize of K1 million, plus a K400,000 recording deal, as well as a trip to the regional Chibuku Road to Fame in Botswana.

To start with, it was a disappointing encounter because, from the word
go, it looked as if those organising the event - the Musicians Union of
Malawi (MUM) and Chibuku Products Limited - were taken unawares to
put the event together.

By noon, when everything was supposed to have started, the
organisers were still mounting the stage. To make matters worse, this
continued even when bands started testing instruments which was a distraction to both the performers and the audience.

At the end of the show, I, together with the other panellists - veteran broadcaster and musician Maria Chidzanja Nkhoma and music lecturer at Chancellor College Andrew Falia, who was the Chief Judge - agreed that the competing groups should have refused to go ahead with the mediocre musical equipment.

I am not sure why the High Table was reserved for Sports and Youth Minister Grace ‘Obama’ Chiume and her officials when the reason we had assembled at the venue was to let the performers play music and be judged.

Because of such a bad decision on how and where to set the stage, a number of things were clearly improvised. So the make-shift stage was clearly that - ‘makeshift’! No wonder it kept mocking the K15 million that was billed for the event.

Just to demonstrate how haphazard the preparations were, while the
competition was still on - and having realised that it would be past dusk before the charade would end - the organisers came on stage and started setting up lighting, something that would have been done at the time the stage was being constructed.

In the end, I was not surprised that one band disputed our judgment that its performance was ‘below par’ because it played in the dark.

Then there was the question of the poor output of the equipment which made voices hoarser than the normal voice of the artist. Or, in a number of instances, the bass guitar would eclipse all other instruments leading to a cacophony of disorganised noise.

I wonder why a competition worth K15 million could fail to hire top-class equipment like that of the calibre of the Mibawa Open Air Music Equipment or indeed the one belonging to Mr. Entertainers Promotion.

It is clear that due to lack of good quality equipment, competing bands that brought other elements like Nyau, Beni and other traditional dancers managed to distract better musical judgement from the audience. In the end, a commendable initiative from Chibuku Products was reduced to be reduced as ‘one of those things’ that have failed to promote the growth of music in Malawi.

The idea of throwing light on talent that is hidden in dark corners of
the country for us all to see and appreciate is really what the local
music industry badly needs. However, when badly done, we should not allow ourselves to be shut up for fear of scaring away the potential sponsors.


If Chibuku Products Limited and MUM think of putting K15 million to good use, they need to be well organised. They should not be afraid to approach those that have music equipment that matter for the sake of the competition. After all, it is going to be a musical competition.

Wednesday, July 9, 2014

When Nigeria invades Malawi

I am not even in doubt; we are musically under heavy attack from Nigerians. All, if not most, vehicles in public transport system have the dominance of Nigerian music.

There have been funny names and titles from this West African country where musical artists have come on the scene and left the local music lovers none-the-wiser.

It all started with artists like D'banj real name ‘Dapo Daniel Oyebanjo’ Nigeria’s pop duo, P-Square of Peter and Paul Okoye as well as Flavour (Chinedu Okoli) it was more like one on those once off thing.

But lately with the mergence on the scene of more Naija artists, as they call it there, like Mcgalaxy with tracks like 'Skeme', Udoka Chigozie Oku a.k.a Selebobo who has featured J. Matin in a remix track called ‘Yoyo’.

There is also Enetimi Alfred Odom better known by his stage name Timaya who has done a track famously known as ‘Shake your Bum Bum’, Nwanchukwu Ozioko, (a.k.a Vast) is one half of the popular singing duo, Bracket whose other member is Obumneme Ali a.k.a. Smash. Ayodeji Ibrahim Balogun known by his stage name Wizkid

Of all the names above one that seem to have taken control is the son of a Billionaire business magnet David Adedeji Adeleke popularly called Davido with tracks like Skelewu, Aye, and Gobe which are all over places that use music in Malawi, of course except Churches but not Christian weddings.

The Nigerian beat has become the heart beat of most entertainment activities in Malawi and their music were popularised by sound tracks in the films.

Of course Shemu Joya has tried to use local music by Agorroso in his films Seasons of Life and The Last Fishing Boat but what I am talking about is having a group of musical compatriots who would do music that will have a recognisable element to be referred to as Nigerian genre for example.

In a country like Malawi, you will have San B coming up with his own thing and calls it ‘Honjo’ and Atumwi will call theirs ‘Sendeza’. The African Representatives to the 2008 World Music Crossroads festival, the Boys from Mzuzu ‘The Body, Mind and Soul’ will call theirs ‘Voodoojazz’. Tay Grin, Nyau Music.

When Malawians musicians claim that they have come up with their own genre, are they fair to themselves?

Ben Mankhamba has tried to do a fusion of traditional dances with western instruments and called it Beni, Mwinoghe, Vimbudza. You see, our quest for a fixed and well established Malawian genre, has been tedious at times; the other day Lucius Banda told us that we were there with his ‘Zulu Woman’ beat.

Edgar and Davis thought a beat like ‘Kale-Kale’ was it; so were the sounds that emerged from the Lhomwe belt of the likes of Alan Namoko and Chimvu River Jazz Band and Michael Mukhito Phiri. Wambali Mkandawire has never called what he plays anything else other than African Jazz whatever this means.

Peter Mawanga and a certain sector of the industry believe he has cracked the elusive code to establish the much sort after Malawian genre with his type of music; but the response has only fascinated the ear of those that can read music.

Daniel Kachamba and his brother Macdonald are said to have been playing ‘Kwera’ music which musical historians claim was born right here in Malawi during the Ndiche Mwalare/Alick Nkhata days.

They claim when Malawians were descending down South Africa in the 1940/50s they took with them the ‘Kwera’ music which the South Africans took as their own and perfected it and became a springboard that has helped them established different genres that are still recognizable as South African.

Now when you hear Ademwiche by Fikisa you do not even want to be told that what you are listening to is a Malawian beat even with the presence of modern instrumentation.

This is clear that this is a traditional beat. But like a chewed bubblegum, where is it?

This is an argument I have ever made in the past, but point here today is why Nigerian music has taken control of all our entertainment joints.

Why is it that when it ripples within your earshot it is easily recognisable as Nigerian music?


Malawi’s Radio Presenters

I have ever said that I have problems calling Malawi radio presenters Disc Jockeys or fondly shortened to DJs based on the knowledge that I have of who a DJ is and what the radio presenters who call themselves DJs do.
Nonetheless, today I am not bothered with whatever names, titles, ranks, designations or positions radio presenters bestow upon themselves. I am here to wonder aloud if these people know their role to make Malawi music what it needs to become.
Forget about the question which one is the Malawi music. But one statement that I have to register from the onset is that Malawian Radio presenters or Disc Jockeys as they love calling themselves are a huge disappointment.
This is not because of the way they live their lives with their spouses and other extramarital activities as it were, but this is to the choices they make when playing music on the radios.
I have no problems with a radio like MBC Radio II or Capital FM who have declared that they are bent at promoting music, which is music. Meaning the foreign music all of us strive to emulate.
However, radio stations like Zodiak Broadcasting Station, Matindi FM and other religiously inclined broadcasters their interests has been cast around locally produced and sang music, call it gospel or secular.
The general complaint is that we have talent when it comes to music and musicians. We also have outlets that suit us but fail to satisfy us all.
Back to the radio presenters, the positions these dudes hold is very privileged and in some countries like Zambia they have used it massively to promote their local music. Someone was telling me there was a time when a decree was imposed where all media outlets in the country were asked to only play Zambian music; I doubt its truthfulness though.
Not that I am suggesting that we do likewise in the country; because we risk clamping down sources where we can learn from.
In that way, we will not have anywhere to assess ourselves as a country to see if we are indeed doing what we should be doing as a musical nation or whether or not we are stepping on the same spot or moving either forward or backward.
However, given that we also impose a similar decree, do you see ourselves achieving anything? Considering that even when the radio presenters have the opportunity to play our local music, others creating programmes that have local music as the only input it still raises a number of questions when you see how these radio presenters comport themselves.
You find that they will stick to a track or an album of a musician who everyone who has an ear for music is condemning due to his or her mediocre feat and yet the so called DJ will be heaping praises that you who is listening fail to see its justification.
In the process, the questions of corrupt radio presenters which has ever come up in this regard pops up again.
While other presenters will do likewise due to naivety, others largely seem to have a hidden interest that is not even well hidden…
If the Malawi music has to grow and glow, its fate, to an extent, also lies in the hands of these people.
Radio promoters or DJs, as they would like me to call them, are promoters of sorts. If they play bad music on their respective radio dials, then it has to be on the back of trying to point at weaknesses in our artists’ music.

May be it is high time radio station started deliberate programmes that look at a particular song or singer and critique their way of performing and final music production.

Patriotism comes in many ways, if presenters give us quality music we promote quality products from Malawi, which can bring us forex before we know it, not to mention catapulting the artist to international stardom.
Next we try to look at what makes one a DJ.



Sunday, June 22, 2014

Oskido’s unprofessional antics

Something is not adding up. Either the problem is in the mediocrity that is our entertainment industry that the so-called ‘big names’ play games with us or there is something professionally wrong with South African artists.
Last time in April we were told by Platinum Entertainment and the Entertainers Promotions that they had invited the renowned South African Kwaito/House star Oskido, real name Oscar Mdlongwa.
He was scheduled to perform at Wakawaka Hotel in Lilongwe on May 4 and later follow up with a Blantyre show at Country Club in Limbe on May 11.
First they announced the postponement of the Lilongwe show but promised come rain or sunshine Oskido will perform in Limbe.
Come the day when patrons had parted ways with their hard-earned K3,000s to sample the famous hits Tsa Mandebele  and Y’Tjujutja (Waichukucha) at Country Club, they were told the artist missed his flight and will, therefore, not make it.
The organisers said they had already paid him all what he had demanded in order for him to come and perform in Malawi and they had to give back to the patrons the money they had paid as entry fees.
The world being a small village these days with the internet, it was clear to establish if indeed Oskido had missed his flight or was playing games. And, good heavens! The dude had another show in Soweto at Dreamers Celebrations alongside Professor and Uhuru, some big names in South Africa who he has collaborated with on some projects.
Locally, there also used to be some gospel and secular artists who used to collect money from organisers while knowing they have other scheduled shows on the same day some 500 kilometres away.
Now this Oskido guy is not just a toddler in the profession and considering that he was named one of the Top 10 Kwaito legends of all time by MTV Base in 2009, you would expect him to be professional.
I don’t want to be tempted to doubt his professionalism by looking at his beginnings because it might not be fair.
But wait a minute; this is a guy who started his career from outside Club Razzmatazz in Hillbrow where he was selling roasted sausages having left Zimbabwe, his father’s home country, for South Africa the home of his mother where he was born.
It was in the early 1990s when late at night he would sneak into the club to have a dance and ended up being fascinated by deejaying. Occasionally he used to take over the mic when DJs were taking a breather.
As the story goes, one day the club’s resident DJ didn’t pitch up and, as fate would have it, Oskido was approached to provide relief and he has never looked back.  
Honestly, a disciplined performer would not take people for granted if he seriously wants to advance professionally. Perhaps he thinks he is advanced professionally already?
Imagine, organisers at the previous event were crestfallen and even refused to go ahead with the show with the local acts that included King Chambiecco, Gwamba, Nessnes, Black Jak, Skeffa Chimoto and Real Sounds Band.
Now Wakawaka Hotel has taken over the initiative and says they have already spent K5 million to bring the artist into the country. The next date is June 29.
My prayer is that come the day, the most sought-after dude should not fail to turn up again, should not miss his flight again.
Perhaps the solace would be in the fact that another South African artist, Big Nuz, also missed his flight last year but he later turned up for the Wakawaka show.
But in the event that Oskido misses his flight again, please organisers shed off the mediocrity displayed last May. This time sue for breach of contract.
Or there is no contractual agreements in these deals?

Tuesday, June 17, 2014

When fame clouds Lulu’s head

Last week I wrote something about the show organised at Lilongwe Golf Club by Mibawa. What I dwelt on more was how I thought Mibawa owner John Nthakomwa is one investor that the Malawi music industry desires his replication.
One of the performers at the function was one local artist artists I hold in high esteem. Lawrence ‘Lulu’ Khwisa is a complete musician. In fact he is a full package that has been sufficiently value added. He is a guitarist, a drummer, a keyboardist, a vocalist, a dancer and a music producer all rolled in one.
It’s not all the time that one person can be as blessed as Lulu is. One thing in the past that made everyone appreciates Lulu, which I still believe is the case, has been his humility despite his multi-endowment.
However, lately it looks like his talent is going to his head and as his fan I would be failing in my duties if I will let it pass as if it is ‘business as usual’.
At this show at the Golf Club I saw a Lulu that attempted to prove to the contrary the humble image that I have always associated with this multi-talented artist.
It all started when the patrons started demanding for particular tracks from several of his albums but he could hear none of such demands.
“Ndizipitatu mukamavuta. Lero ndiyimba zofuna zanga. Musandiwuze zochita.” (I will leave if you will be pestering me. Today I will sing what I want. Don’t tell me what to do).  This was the response from Lulu when his fans made demands to him. When they kept on demanding for tracks that they wanted he retorted: “Mukupitiriza? Ndizipitatu. Tikatere ndiye timawerukapotu”. (Are you still continuing [demanding songs]? I will leave the stage. This is where I call it quit.)
Make your own judgement but to me who has seen Lulu perform for countless times, I think this was a new phenomenon. It does not augur well for the image of humility that he has cut for himself over the years. 
The danger of such tendency when it creeps in the psyche of our artists is that it eats away the system and takes away their allure. We have examples where artists have become big headed and telling off the very patrons they perform for, only to experience a crumble in line with the saying that ‘Pride comes before a fall.
Before it comes to this, Lulu has people like me who would shout out a warning and plead with him to remain what the industry has known him to be.
When musicians compose, they do it for the fans. When they perform, the fans they compose for show their love for particular songs and while artists prepare what exactly they will perform they also need to be accommodative as Lulu has been over the years.
Because he has always been compromising, his fans have been attuned to behave in a way where they will express their demands and this cannot be changed just one day without warning.
Like in this case, Lulu was supposed to be tactical in sending his message across that he would not be doing what his fans were demanding. The absence of this tact portrayed a bad image of an arrogant Lulu who is getting drunk with fame which is ironically coming from the very fans he wanted to be bossy with.
I hope this is not the new Lulu.

When music runs into a saviour

John Nthakomwa is one investor that the Malawi music industry desires his replication. It’s a pity it had to wait until last Sunday on June the first for me to realise this.
There has been a time when I have been shocked with disbelief. Last Sunday was such a day. Mibawa has acquired musical equipment that is going with a movable first-rate stage which is valued some billions of kwacha.
To imagine that there are people who can invest such huge amount in entertainment you really cannot help it but doff your hat. If one would be taken by a pleasant surprise at the sight of the equipment and numerous speakers that produce crystal clear sound, then you would also be in profound disbelief at the quality of sound that bellied the atmosphere.
Mibawa Resident Band with Goma Nyondo and his two vocal leading partners, the accomplished reggae outfit Soul Raiders, Skeffa Chimoto, Lawrence Khwisa and Faith Mussa sounded as if they were using their studio recorded music in CDs.
Well, the proof was when Mibawa and Soul Raiders who played several famous reggae copies from Bob Marley to Peter Tosh to Culture faultlessly were there to prove that the patrons were indeed faced with reality.
Now with such huge musical investment, Nthakomwa now wants to continue mesmerising the country’s music lovers.
Nthakomwa has now even invested in what he is calling Mibawa One Stop Complex which will include recording studios – mark studio(s), shops restaurants and an entertainment club. All this will be along the Midima Roundabout in Limbe Blantyre.
In his words Nthakomwa says they have invested in sound and studio equipment and now thet want to take the lead in development of local contebnt for Malawian Television stations which dish out too much foreign content.
I mean this is what I have always been talking about.
Nthakomwa is the man that all and sundry need to emulate. Who does not use music at one point or the other? But even when the response would be a deafening affirmative on how everyone uses music there has not been much when it comes to investment in this industry.
Of course you cannot take it away from lawyer Jai Banda, Mr. Entertainer himself who for years has really tried to promote the music industry with huge investments, but for long he has been a lonely voice. Investors like parliamentarian Lucius Banda have really tried but not given credit because he is an artist himself and the feeling has been that it is to his personal benefit.
But when you check the list of those that I have mentioned above, you will appreciate that these are individuals, with have companies like Chibuku Industries, Sunbird Hotels who are not seriously into the needed investments.
I have always argued that companies like Carlsberg thrive on using music to promote and achieve sales of their products but they have not invested a lot into the industry. Therefore when the music industry gets blessed when it has people like John Nthakomwa he needs to get encouragement from the private sector as well as the government.
Well, what was ironic last Sunday was that here was quality but patrons were dropping in, in dribs and drabs but John Nthakomwa was undeterred as he managed the sound console to produce the quality that ever music loving ear would kill for.
With the kind of high-tech equipment that Mibawa has invested into, musicians will no longer find excuses for their handicap to dish out the best and I can now declare that open-air music concerts in Malawi will never be the same.   

Fitting Songs in Political impasse

Granted, no one seems to know when next we are going to swear in our fifth President as it is now apparent that President Joyce Banda has done her God given two-year-term.

While people on all levels of life are trying to make sense of the political situation that the nation is faced with, the artists have shown that they do not want to be left behind.

You rarely hear about the ‘Soul Raiders’ – a Lilongwe based reggae band led by Prince Martin. Those that have followed Malawi reggae music would not need introduction of who Martin is.

Our musicians are known to get involved in politics, but it is usually when the campaigning in ongoing like the case of Lucius Banda and Joseph Nkasa for example.

But it is perhaps only late local Reggae King Evison Matafale who showed a way on how reactive artists can be to come up with prompt compositions based on the situation on our hand. Remember ‘Time Mark’ a track he did soon after the September 11, 2001 attack when terrorists hijacked four commercial airliners to strike targets in the United States where they killed nearly 3,000 people died.

The track got revs for its swiftness and the wit observed in its composition. Matafale who was known to play Reggae music that stuck to the Rub-A-Dub a style characterized by a powerful, round, low and deep bass, as well as a very simple drumming, with the bass drum and the snare drum alternating on the first beat of each bar. But with ‘Time Mark’ he brought an urgency to the track that made it look like the ‘ska’ version of reggae.

Now with the current political scenario, the Soul Raiders have come up with this track ‘Song for my Nation’ which, well, speaks more of what people are into with not knowing where the country goes next. Here is part of the lyrics:

My nation is in frustration,/ Lacking direction;/ Does the government has a solution?/ I doubt./This song is for my nation/ In desperation,/Life is in devaluation

Please God, give us direction/ we’ve lost our vision/Can't see the way/And who's gotta bring peace to my nation?/ Seems there's no way out/ From this situation.

Of course the situation is not as hopeless as the track depicts. First impression would be that it is a very good reggae track.

On second thought though is that it lacks the urgency that Matafale used when he did ‘Time Mark’.

This important message coming at the ‘correct’ time should have been packaged in an extraordinary envelope.

My point is, you would miss the gist of the track’s theme if you would listen to it casually as just one of the Soul Raiders’ tracks.

This point is even strengthened by how one of the band members Joel Suzi has posted it on Facebook when I first saw it.

In fact what compelled me to listen to the track were they lyrics that have been posted alongside a link to the reverberation website where the track has been uploaded.

A unique track like ‘Song for my Nation’ needed a far better innovation in terms of choice of the reggae beat to go with it. However, that said, it does not take away the spirit shown by the reaction from our artists from these situation. It’s wrong to always think of singing praise songs – for a price of course – when politicians are campaigning for positions.

Of course the argument would be, so what changes can it bring to the political situation, but the fact is the ability from our artists to be charged artistically and come up with tracks like ‘Song for my Nation’.